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Watch Words

FROM 'ALARM WATCH' TO 'ZODIAC'...

The following pages are a glossary of terms associated with horology, watches and watchmaking. Please click on one of the links or glossary terms below to learn more about them. Most of the terms are enhanced with detailed imagery. If you would like us to list any other words that you think may be helpful, please contact me direct chris@christopherward.co.uk. We will update the glossary frequently.

 

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F – WATCH WORDS

 

Flange

The usually inclined ring that separates the crystal from the dial. The flange is sometimes equipped with features such as tachymetric scales and pulsometers.

 

 

Flinque

Engraving on the dial or case of a watch, covered with an enamel layer.

 

 

Fluted

Said of surfaces worked with thin parallel grooves, mostly on dials or case bezels.

 

 

Fly-back

Feature combined with chronograph functions, that allows a new measurement starting from zero (and interrupting a measuring already under way) by pressing down a single pusher, i.e. without stopping, zeroing and restarting the whole mechanism. Originally, this function was developed to meet the needs of pilots.

 

 

Fold-over Clasp

Hinged and jointed element, normally of the same material as the one used for the case. It allows easy fastening of the bracelet on the wrist. Often provided with a snap-in locking device, sometimes with an additional clip or push-piece.

 

 

Fourth Wheel

The seconds wheel in going-train.

 

 

Frequency

Generally defined as the number of cycles per time unit; in horology it is the number of oscillations of a balance every two seconds or of its vibrations per second. For practical purposes, frequency is expressed in vibrations per hour (vph). See also Vibration.

 

 

Fusee

A conical part with a spiral groove on which a chain or cord attached to the barrel is wound. Its purpose is to equalize the driving power transmitted to the train. Almost all 16th, 17th and 18th Century watches have a fusee.

 

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